The Shooting Gallery

The Shooting Gallery Eight stories by one of Japan s most important women authors concern the struggles of women in a repressive society An unwed mother introduces her children to their father A woman confronts the other

  • Title: The Shooting Gallery
  • Author: Yūko Tsushima Geraldine Harcourt
  • ISBN: 9780811213561
  • Page: 187
  • Format: Paperback
  • Eight stories by one of Japan s most important women authors concern the struggles of women in a repressive society An unwed mother introduces her children to their father A woman confronts the other woman A young single mother resents her children These stories touch on universal themes of passion and jealousy, motherhood s joys and sorrows, and the tuEight stories by one of Japan s most important women authors concern the struggles of women in a repressive society An unwed mother introduces her children to their father A woman confronts the other woman A young single mother resents her children These stories touch on universal themes of passion and jealousy, motherhood s joys and sorrows, and the tug of war between responsibility and entrapment.

    • Free Download [Music Book] ☆ The Shooting Gallery - by Yūko Tsushima Geraldine Harcourt Ø
      187 Yūko Tsushima Geraldine Harcourt
    • thumbnail Title: Free Download [Music Book] ☆ The Shooting Gallery - by Yūko Tsushima Geraldine Harcourt Ø
      Posted by:Yūko Tsushima Geraldine Harcourt
      Published :2019-03-24T15:27:41+00:00

    One thought on “The Shooting Gallery

    1. David

      Quiet, reflective, sad."She could no longer bring herself to apologise. She was convinced that the chance she'd missed had been her very last, and once she'd convinced herself, that was what, in effect, it became."

    2. Rise

      The Shooting Gallery is a collection of eight short stories about modern women and the difficulties they experience in the face of divorce or family pressures. Tsushima Yūko portrays single mothers and separated women with a generous sympathy.The eight stories display a diversity of approaches that are hard to categorize into a single style. They are mostly about the aftermaths of a divorce and they reveal a writer concerned with gender disparities and a woman's search for freedom. Tsushima's f [...]

    3. Shiantel

      Everybody is sad, single, and raising children that were the result of an affair. But overall a breezy and ethereal read I would recommend.

    4. Emily I

      Tsushima has a clear eye for detail and psychology, particularly concerning women and children; her mostly female protagonists, and their interrelationships--mother and daughter, daughter and child--are reflective, thought-provoking and insightful. However, her portrayals of male characters are rather two-dimensional--perhaps this is because of the female perspective, but it's disheartening to see them interested in nothing more than sex, devising excuses for their own eccentricities and foibles [...]

    5. Jim

      Well-written accounts about the daily lives and Japanese women, many of whom are single parents with children because of death of husbands or divorce. I decided against the use of "stories", as in most instances little plot is involved. "Slices of lives" would be a better description. I never really felt all that involved in the goings-on, but kept reading, as the scenes were described differently than is customary in Western prose.

    6. Jacquelyn

      I'm a fan of Japanese literature, and was rather disturbed to find that this collection left me cold. A reviewer called Tsushima the leading Japanese woman writer today, and I was enthused about venturing into her world. But her world was disjointed, unconvincing and not at all compelling to me. I'm not sure if this is a cultural issue - I like lots of Japanese authors, so I doubt it - or something else. Should I try other works by Tsushima, I wonder?

    7. Jessica

      I enjoyed the last two stories much more than the earlier ones in this book by the daughter of author Osamu Dazai. It's interesting to remember that Tsushima's father committed suicide when reading the last story in particular, but I was glad not to have known Dazai was her father until after I read the story.

    8. James

      Very bleak set of short stories about women suffering in Japan. Some of the stories were better than others but came across as pretentious and didactic.

    9. Kathy

      I thought the first story was really well written, but when after reading several more of them, the themes/main characters seemed a bit repetitive.

    10. dead letter office

      really kind of great stories, each (as far as i remember) about japanese women. i like the way she writes (at least in translation).

    11. b bb bbbb bbbbbbbb

      Could not get into this. I finished a couple of the stories, but ended up skipping/skimming the majority of them.

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